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From: Mark Wielaard <mark@klomp.org>
To: bzip2-devel@sourceware.org
Cc: "Anibal Monsalve Salazar" <anibal@debian.org>,
	"Santiago Ruano Rincón" <santiago@debian.org>,
	"Anthony Fok" <foka@debian.org>, "Mark Wielaard" <mark@klomp.org>
Subject: [PATCH 3/3] Add generation of bzip2.txt and bzip2.1.preformatted to Makefile.
Date: Tue, 01 Jan 2019 00:00:00 -0000	[thread overview]
Message-ID: <20190721205419.2904-4-mark@klomp.org> (raw)
In-Reply-To: <20190721205419.2904-1-mark@klomp.org>

And remove both pages from the repository since the will now be
generated by make dist. Also don't try to update them in
prepare-release.sh script.
---
 Makefile             |  10 +-
 bzip2.1.preformatted | 399 -------------------------------------------
 bzip2.txt            | 391 ------------------------------------------
 prepare-release.sh   |   2 +-
 4 files changed, 9 insertions(+), 793 deletions(-)
 delete mode 100644 bzip2.1.preformatted
 delete mode 100644 bzip2.txt

diff --git a/Makefile b/Makefile
index f8a1772..b0fef95 100644
--- a/Makefile
+++ b/Makefile
@@ -135,7 +135,7 @@ bzip2recover.o: bzip2recover.c
 
 
 distclean: clean
-	rm -f manual.ps manual.html manual.pdf
+	rm -f manual.ps manual.html manual.pdf bzip2.txt bzip2.1.preformatted
 
 DISTNAME=bzip2-1.0.8
 dist: check manual
@@ -205,7 +205,13 @@ dist: check manual
 MANUAL_SRCS= 	bz-common.xsl bz-fo.xsl bz-html.xsl bzip.css \
 		entities.xml manual.xml 
 
-manual: manual.html manual.ps manual.pdf
+bzip2.txt: bzip2.1
+	MANWIDTH=67 man --ascii ./$^ > $@
+
+bzip2.1.preformatted: bzip2.1
+	MAN_KEEP_FORMATTING=1 MANWIDTH=67 man -E UTF-8 ./$^ > $@
+
+manual: manual.html manual.ps manual.pdf bzip2.txt bzip2.1.preformatted
 
 manual.ps: $(MANUAL_SRCS)
 	./xmlproc.sh -ps manual.xml
diff --git a/bzip2.1.preformatted b/bzip2.1.preformatted
deleted file mode 100644
index 787f1c6..0000000
--- a/bzip2.1.preformatted
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,399 +0,0 @@
-bzip2(1)                                                 bzip2(1)
-
-
-
-N\bNA\bAM\bME\bE
-       bzip2, bunzip2 − a block‐sorting file compressor, v1.0.8
-       bzcat − decompresses files to stdout
-       bzip2recover − recovers data from damaged bzip2 files
-
-
-S\bSY\bYN\bNO\bOP\bPS\bSI\bIS\bS
-       b\bbz\bzi\bip\bp2\b2 [ −\b−c\bcd\bdf\bfk\bkq\bqs\bst\btv\bvz\bzV\bVL\bL1\b12\b23\b34\b45\b56\b67\b78\b89\b9 ] [ _\bf_\bi_\bl_\be_\bn_\ba_\bm_\be_\bs _\b._\b._\b.  ]
-       b\bbu\bun\bnz\bzi\bip\bp2\b2 [ −\b−f\bfk\bkv\bvs\bsV\bVL\bL ] [ _\bf_\bi_\bl_\be_\bn_\ba_\bm_\be_\bs _\b._\b._\b.  ]
-       b\bbz\bzc\bca\bat\bt [ −\b−s\bs ] [ _\bf_\bi_\bl_\be_\bn_\ba_\bm_\be_\bs _\b._\b._\b.  ]
-       b\bbz\bzi\bip\bp2\b2r\bre\bec\bco\bov\bve\ber\br _\bf_\bi_\bl_\be_\bn_\ba_\bm_\be
-
-
-D\bDE\bES\bSC\bCR\bRI\bIP\bPT\bTI\bIO\bON\bN
-       _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2  compresses  files  using  the Burrows‐Wheeler block
-       sorting text compression algorithm,  and  Huffman  coding.
-       Compression  is  generally  considerably  better than that
-       achieved by more conventional LZ77/LZ78‐based compressors,
-       and  approaches  the performance of the PPM family of sta­
-       tistical compressors.
-
-       The command‐line options are deliberately very similar  to
-       those of _\bG_\bN_\bU _\bg_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b, but they are not identical.
-
-       _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2  expects  a list of file names to accompany the com­
-       mand‐line flags.  Each file is replaced  by  a  compressed
-       version  of  itself,  with  the  name "original_name.bz2".
-       Each compressed file has the same modification date,  per­
-       missions, and, when possible, ownership as the correspond­
-       ing original, so that these properties  can  be  correctly
-       restored  at  decompression  time.   File name handling is
-       naive in the sense that there is no mechanism for preserv­
-       ing  original file names, permissions, ownerships or dates
-       in filesystems which lack these concepts, or have  serious
-       file name length restrictions, such as MS‐DOS.
-
-       _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2  and  _\bb_\bu_\bn_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2 will by default not overwrite existing
-       files.  If you want this to happen, specify the −f flag.
-
-       If no file names  are  specified,  _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2  compresses  from
-       standard  input  to  standard output.  In this case, _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2
-       will decline to write compressed output to a terminal,  as
-       this  would  be  entirely  incomprehensible  and therefore
-       pointless.
-
-       _\bb_\bu_\bn_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2 (or _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2 _\b−_\bd_\b) decompresses  all  specified  files.
-       Files which were not created by _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2 will be detected and
-       ignored, and a warning issued.  _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2  attempts  to  guess
-       the  filename  for  the decompressed file from that of the
-       compressed file as follows:
-
-              filename.bz2    becomes   filename
-              filename.bz     becomes   filename
-              filename.tbz2   becomes   filename.tar
-              filename.tbz    becomes   filename.tar
-              anyothername    becomes   anyothername.out
-
-       If the file does not end in one of the recognised endings,
-       _\b._\bb_\bz_\b2_\b,  _\b._\bb_\bz_\b,  _\b._\bt_\bb_\bz_\b2 or _\b._\bt_\bb_\bz_\b, _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2 complains that it cannot
-       guess the name of the original file, and uses the original
-       name with _\b._\bo_\bu_\bt appended.
-
-       As  with compression, supplying no filenames causes decom­
-       pression from standard input to standard output.
-
-       _\bb_\bu_\bn_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2 will correctly decompress a file which is the con­
-       catenation of two or more compressed files.  The result is
-       the concatenation of the corresponding uncompressed files.
-       Integrity testing (−t) of concatenated compressed files is
-       also supported.
-
-       You can also compress or decompress files to the  standard
-       output  by giving the −c flag.  Multiple files may be com­
-       pressed and decompressed like this.  The resulting outputs
-       are  fed  sequentially to stdout.  Compression of multiple
-       files in this manner generates a stream containing  multi­
-       ple compressed file representations.  Such a stream can be
-       decompressed correctly only  by  _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2  version  0.9.0  or
-       later.   Earlier  versions of _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2 will stop after decom­
-       pressing the first file in the stream.
-
-       _\bb_\bz_\bc_\ba_\bt (or _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2 _\b‐_\bd_\bc_\b) decompresses all specified  files  to
-       the standard output.
-
-       _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2  will  read arguments from the environment variables
-       _\bB_\bZ_\bI_\bP_\b2 and _\bB_\bZ_\bI_\bP_\b, in  that  order,  and  will  process  them
-       before  any  arguments  read  from the command line.  This
-       gives a convenient way to supply default arguments.
-
-       Compression is always performed, even  if  the  compressed
-       file  is slightly larger than the original.  Files of less
-       than about one hundred bytes tend to get larger, since the
-       compression  mechanism  has  a  constant  overhead  in the
-       region of 50 bytes.  Random data (including the output  of
-       most  file  compressors)  is  coded at about 8.05 bits per
-       byte, giving an expansion of around 0.5%.
-
-       As a self‐check for your  protection,  _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2  uses  32‐bit
-       CRCs  to make sure that the decompressed version of a file
-       is identical to the original.  This guards against corrup­
-       tion  of  the compressed data, and against undetected bugs
-       in _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2 (hopefully very unlikely).  The chances  of  data
-       corruption  going  undetected  is  microscopic,  about one
-       chance in four billion for each file processed.  Be aware,
-       though,  that  the  check occurs upon decompression, so it
-       can only tell you that something is wrong.  It can’t  help
-       you  recover  the original uncompressed data.  You can use
-       _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2_\br_\be_\bc_\bo_\bv_\be_\br to try to recover data from damaged files.
-
-       Return values: 0 for a normal exit,  1  for  environmental
-       problems  (file not found, invalid flags, I/O errors, &c),
-       2 to indicate a corrupt compressed file, 3 for an internal
-       consistency error (eg, bug) which caused _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2 to panic.
-
-
-O\bOP\bPT\bTI\bIO\bON\bNS\bS
-       −\b−c\bc ‐\b‐‐\b‐s\bst\btd\bdo\bou\but\bt
-              Compress or decompress to standard output.
-
-       −\b−d\bd ‐\b‐‐\b‐d\bde\bec\bco\bom\bmp\bpr\bre\bes\bss\bs
-              Force  decompression.  _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2_\b, _\bb_\bu_\bn_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2 and _\bb_\bz_\bc_\ba_\bt are
-              really the same program,  and  the  decision  about
-              what  actions to take is done on the basis of which
-              name is used.  This flag overrides that  mechanism,
-              and forces _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2 to decompress.
-
-       −\b−z\bz ‐\b‐‐\b‐c\bco\bom\bmp\bpr\bre\bes\bss\bs
-              The   complement   to   −d:   forces   compression,
-              regardless of the invocation name.
-
-       −\b−t\bt ‐\b‐‐\b‐t\bte\bes\bst\bt
-              Check integrity of the specified file(s), but don’t
-              decompress  them.   This  really  performs  a trial
-              decompression and throws away the result.
-
-       −\b−f\bf ‐\b‐‐\b‐f\bfo\bor\brc\bce\be
-              Force overwrite of output files.   Normally,  _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2
-              will  not  overwrite  existing  output files.  Also
-              forces _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2 to break hard links to files, which it
-              otherwise wouldn’t do.
-
-              bzip2  normally  declines to decompress files which
-              don’t have the  correct  magic  header  bytes.   If
-              forced  (‐f),  however,  it  will  pass  such files
-              through unmodified.  This is how GNU gzip  behaves.
-
-       −\b−k\bk ‐\b‐‐\b‐k\bke\bee\bep\bp
-              Keep  (don’t delete) input files during compression
-              or decompression.
-
-       −\b−s\bs ‐\b‐‐\b‐s\bsm\bma\bal\bll\bl
-              Reduce memory usage, for compression, decompression
-              and  testing.   Files  are  decompressed and tested
-              using a modified algorithm which only requires  2.5
-              bytes  per  block byte.  This means any file can be
-              decompressed in 2300k of memory,  albeit  at  about
-              half the normal speed.
-
-              During  compression,  −s  selects  a  block size of
-              200k, which limits memory use to  around  the  same
-              figure,  at  the expense of your compression ratio.
-              In short, if your  machine  is  low  on  memory  (8
-              megabytes  or  less),  use  −s for everything.  See
-              MEMORY MANAGEMENT below.
-
-       −\b−q\bq ‐\b‐‐\b‐q\bqu\bui\bie\bet\bt
-              Suppress non‐essential warning messages.   Messages
-              pertaining  to I/O errors and other critical events
-              will not be suppressed.
-
-       −\b−v\bv ‐\b‐‐\b‐v\bve\ber\brb\bbo\bos\bse\be
-              Verbose mode ‐‐ show the compression ratio for each
-              file  processed.   Further  −v’s  increase the ver­
-              bosity level, spewing out lots of information which
-              is primarily of interest for diagnostic purposes.
-
-       −\b−L\bL ‐\b‐‐\b‐l\bli\bic\bce\ben\bns\bse\be ‐\b‐V\bV ‐\b‐‐\b‐v\bve\ber\brs\bsi\bio\bon\bn
-              Display  the  software  version,  license terms and
-              conditions.
-
-       −\b−1\b1 (\b(o\bor\br −\b−−\b−f\bfa\bas\bst\bt)\b) t\bto\bo −\b−9\b9 (\b(o\bor\br −\b−−\b−b\bbe\bes\bst\bt)\b)
-              Set the block size to 100 k, 200 k ..  900  k  when
-              compressing.   Has  no  effect  when decompressing.
-              See MEMORY MANAGEMENT below.  The −−fast and −−best
-              aliases  are  primarily for GNU gzip compatibility.
-              In particular, −−fast doesn’t make things  signifi­
-              cantly  faster.   And  −−best  merely  selects  the
-              default behaviour.
-
-       −\b−‐\b‐     Treats all subsequent arguments as file names, even
-              if they start with a dash.  This is so you can han­
-              dle files with names beginning  with  a  dash,  for
-              example: bzip2 −‐ −myfilename.
-
-       −\b−‐\b‐r\bre\bep\bpe\bet\bti\bit\bti\biv\bve\be‐\b‐f\bfa\bas\bst\bt ‐\b‐‐\b‐r\bre\bep\bpe\bet\bti\bit\bti\biv\bve\be‐\b‐b\bbe\bes\bst\bt
-              These  flags  are  redundant  in versions 0.9.5 and
-              above.  They provided some coarse control over  the
-              behaviour  of the sorting algorithm in earlier ver­
-              sions, which was sometimes useful.  0.9.5 and above
-              have  an  improved  algorithm  which  renders these
-              flags irrelevant.
-
-
-M\bME\bEM\bMO\bOR\bRY\bY M\bMA\bAN\bNA\bAG\bGE\bEM\bME\bEN\bNT\bT
-       _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2 compresses large files in blocks.   The  block  size
-       affects  both  the  compression  ratio  achieved,  and the
-       amount of memory needed for compression and decompression.
-       The  flags  −1  through  −9  specify  the block size to be
-       100,000 bytes through 900,000 bytes (the default)  respec­
-       tively.   At  decompression  time, the block size used for
-       compression is read from  the  header  of  the  compressed
-       file, and _\bb_\bu_\bn_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2 then allocates itself just enough memory
-       to decompress the file.  Since block sizes are  stored  in
-       compressed  files,  it follows that the flags −1 to −9 are
-       irrelevant to and so ignored during decompression.
-
-       Compression and decompression requirements, in bytes,  can
-       be estimated as:
-
-              Compression:   400k + ( 8 x block size )
-
-              Decompression: 100k + ( 4 x block size ), or
-                             100k + ( 2.5 x block size )
-
-       Larger  block  sizes  give  rapidly  diminishing  marginal
-       returns.  Most of the compression comes from the first two
-       or  three hundred k of block size, a fact worth bearing in
-       mind when using _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2  on  small  machines.   It  is  also
-       important  to  appreciate  that  the  decompression memory
-       requirement is set at compression time by  the  choice  of
-       block size.
-
-       For  files  compressed  with  the default 900k block size,
-       _\bb_\bu_\bn_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2 will require about 3700 kbytes to decompress.   To
-       support decompression of any file on a 4 megabyte machine,
-       _\bb_\bu_\bn_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2 has an option to  decompress  using  approximately
-       half this amount of memory, about 2300 kbytes.  Decompres­
-       sion speed is also halved, so you should use  this  option
-       only where necessary.  The relevant flag is ‐s.
-
-       In general, try and use the largest block size memory con­
-       straints  allow,  since  that  maximises  the  compression
-       achieved.   Compression and decompression speed are virtu­
-       ally unaffected by block size.
-
-       Another significant point applies to files which fit in  a
-       single  block  ‐‐  that  means  most files you’d encounter
-       using a large block  size.   The  amount  of  real  memory
-       touched is proportional to the size of the file, since the
-       file is smaller than a block.  For example, compressing  a
-       file  20,000  bytes  long  with the flag ‐9 will cause the
-       compressor to allocate around 7600k of  memory,  but  only
-       touch 400k + 20000 * 8 = 560 kbytes of it.  Similarly, the
-       decompressor will allocate 3700k but  only  touch  100k  +
-       20000 * 4 = 180 kbytes.
-
-       Here  is a table which summarises the maximum memory usage
-       for different block sizes.  Also  recorded  is  the  total
-       compressed  size for 14 files of the Calgary Text Compres­
-       sion Corpus totalling 3,141,622 bytes.  This column  gives
-       some  feel  for  how  compression  varies with block size.
-       These figures tend to understate the advantage  of  larger
-       block  sizes  for  larger files, since the Corpus is domi­
-       nated by smaller files.
-
-                  Compress   Decompress   Decompress   Corpus
-           Flag     usage      usage       ‐s usage     Size
-
-            ‐1      1200k       500k         350k      914704
-            ‐2      2000k       900k         600k      877703
-            ‐3      2800k      1300k         850k      860338
-            ‐4      3600k      1700k        1100k      846899
-            ‐5      4400k      2100k        1350k      845160
-            ‐6      5200k      2500k        1600k      838626
-            ‐7      6100k      2900k        1850k      834096
-            ‐8      6800k      3300k        2100k      828642
-            ‐9      7600k      3700k        2350k      828642
-
-
-R\bRE\bEC\bCO\bOV\bVE\bER\bRI\bIN\bNG\bG D\bDA\bAT\bTA\bA F\bFR\bRO\bOM\bM D\bDA\bAM\bMA\bAG\bGE\bED\bD F\bFI\bIL\bLE\bES\bS
-       _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2 compresses files in blocks, usually 900kbytes  long.
-       Each block is handled independently.  If a media or trans­
-       mission error causes a multi‐block  .bz2  file  to  become
-       damaged,  it  may  be  possible  to  recover data from the
-       undamaged blocks in the file.
-
-       The compressed representation of each block  is  delimited
-       by  a  48‐bit pattern, which makes it possible to find the
-       block boundaries with reasonable  certainty.   Each  block
-       also  carries its own 32‐bit CRC, so damaged blocks can be
-       distinguished from undamaged ones.
-
-       _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2_\br_\be_\bc_\bo_\bv_\be_\br is a  simple  program  whose  purpose  is  to
-       search  for blocks in .bz2 files, and write each block out
-       into its own .bz2 file.  You can then use _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2 −t to test
-       the integrity of the resulting files, and decompress those
-       which are undamaged.
-
-       _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2_\br_\be_\bc_\bo_\bv_\be_\br takes a single argument, the name of the dam­
-       aged    file,    and    writes    a    number   of   files
-       "rec00001file.bz2",  "rec00002file.bz2",  etc,  containing
-       the   extracted   blocks.   The   output   filenames   are
-       designed  so  that the use of wildcards in subsequent pro­
-       cessing  ‐‐ for example, "bzip2 ‐dc  rec*file.bz2 > recov­
-       ered_data" ‐‐ processes the files in the correct order.
-
-       _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2_\br_\be_\bc_\bo_\bv_\be_\br should be of most use dealing with large .bz2
-       files,  as  these will contain many blocks.  It is clearly
-       futile to use it on damaged single‐block  files,  since  a
-       damaged  block  cannot  be recovered.  If you wish to min­
-       imise any potential data loss through media  or  transmis­
-       sion errors, you might consider compressing with a smaller
-       block size.
-
-
-P\bPE\bER\bRF\bFO\bOR\bRM\bMA\bAN\bNC\bCE\bE N\bNO\bOT\bTE\bES\bS
-       The sorting phase of compression gathers together  similar
-       strings  in  the  file.  Because of this, files containing
-       very long runs of  repeated  symbols,  like  "aabaabaabaab
-       ..."   (repeated  several hundred times) may compress more
-       slowly than normal.  Versions 0.9.5 and  above  fare  much
-       better  than previous versions in this respect.  The ratio
-       between worst‐case and average‐case compression time is in
-       the  region  of  10:1.  For previous versions, this figure
-       was more like 100:1.  You can use the −vvvv option to mon­
-       itor progress in great detail, if you want.
-
-       Decompression speed is unaffected by these phenomena.
-
-       _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2  usually  allocates  several  megabytes of memory to
-       operate in, and then charges all over it in a fairly  ran­
-       dom  fashion.   This means that performance, both for com­
-       pressing and decompressing, is largely determined  by  the
-       speed  at  which  your  machine  can service cache misses.
-       Because of this, small changes to the code to  reduce  the
-       miss  rate  have  been observed to give disproportionately
-       large performance improvements.  I imagine _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2 will per­
-       form best on machines with very large caches.
-
-
-C\bCA\bAV\bVE\bEA\bAT\bTS\bS
-       I/O  error  messages  are not as helpful as they could be.
-       _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2 tries hard to detect I/O errors  and  exit  cleanly,
-       but  the  details  of  what  the problem is sometimes seem
-       rather misleading.
-
-       This manual page pertains to version 1.0.8 of _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2_\b.  Com­
-       pressed  data created by this version is entirely forwards
-       and  backwards  compatible  with   the   previous   public
-       releases,  versions  0.1pl2,  0.9.0,  0.9.5, 1.0.0, 1.0.1, 
-       1.0.2 and above, but with the  following  exception: 0.9.0
-       and above can  correctly decompress  multiple concatenated
-       compressed files.  0.1pl2  cannot do this;  it  will  stop 
-       after  decompressing just the first file in the stream.
-
-       _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2_\br_\be_\bc_\bo_\bv_\be_\br  versions prior to 1.0.2 used 32‐bit integers
-       to represent bit positions in compressed  files,  so  they
-       could  not handle compressed files more than 512 megabytes
-       long.  Versions 1.0.2 and above use 64‐bit  ints  on  some
-       platforms  which  support them (GNU supported targets, and
-       Windows).  To establish whether or  not  bzip2recover  was
-       built  with  such  a limitation, run it without arguments.
-       In any event you can build yourself an  unlimited  version
-       if  you  can  recompile  it  with MaybeUInt64 set to be an
-       unsigned 64‐bit integer.
-
-
-
-
-A\bAU\bUT\bTH\bHO\bOR\bR
-       Julian Seward, jseward@acm.org.
-
-       https://sourceware.org/bzip2/
-
-       The ideas embodied in _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b2 are due to (at least) the fol­
-       lowing  people: Michael Burrows and David Wheeler (for the
-       block sorting transformation), David Wheeler  (again,  for
-       the Huffman coder), Peter Fenwick (for the structured cod­
-       ing model in the original _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b, and many refinements), and
-       Alistair  Moffat,  Radford  Neal  and  Ian Witten (for the
-       arithmetic  coder  in  the  original  _\bb_\bz_\bi_\bp_\b)_\b.   I  am  much
-       indebted for their help, support and advice.  See the man­
-       ual in the source distribution for pointers to sources  of
-       documentation.  Christian von Roques encouraged me to look
-       for faster sorting algorithms, so as to speed up  compres­
-       sion.  Bela Lubkin encouraged me to improve the worst‐case
-       compression performance.  Donna Robinson XMLised the docu­
-       mentation.   The bz* scripts are derived from those of GNU
-       gzip.  Many people sent patches, helped  with  portability
-       problems,  lent  machines,  gave advice and were generally
-       helpful.
-
-
-
-                                                         bzip2(1)
diff --git a/bzip2.txt b/bzip2.txt
deleted file mode 100644
index a50570b..0000000
--- a/bzip2.txt
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,391 +0,0 @@
-
-NAME
-       bzip2, bunzip2 - a block-sorting file compressor, v1.0.8
-       bzcat - decompresses files to stdout
-       bzip2recover - recovers data from damaged bzip2 files
-
-
-SYNOPSIS
-       bzip2 [ -cdfkqstvzVL123456789 ] [ filenames ...  ]
-       bunzip2 [ -fkvsVL ] [ filenames ...  ]
-       bzcat [ -s ] [ filenames ...  ]
-       bzip2recover filename
-
-
-DESCRIPTION
-       bzip2  compresses  files  using  the Burrows-Wheeler block
-       sorting text compression algorithm,  and  Huffman  coding.
-       Compression  is  generally  considerably  better than that
-       achieved by more conventional LZ77/LZ78-based compressors,
-       and  approaches  the performance of the PPM family of sta-
-       tistical compressors.
-
-       The command-line options are deliberately very similar  to
-       those of GNU gzip, but they are not identical.
-
-       bzip2  expects  a list of file names to accompany the com-
-       mand-line flags.  Each file is replaced  by  a  compressed
-       version  of  itself,  with  the  name "original_name.bz2".
-       Each compressed file has the same modification date,  per-
-       missions, and, when possible, ownership as the correspond-
-       ing original, so that these properties  can  be  correctly
-       restored  at  decompression  time.   File name handling is
-       naive in the sense that there is no mechanism for preserv-
-       ing  original file names, permissions, ownerships or dates
-       in filesystems which lack these concepts, or have  serious
-       file name length restrictions, such as MS-DOS.
-
-       bzip2  and  bunzip2 will by default not overwrite existing
-       files.  If you want this to happen, specify the -f flag.
-
-       If no file names  are  specified,  bzip2  compresses  from
-       standard  input  to  standard output.  In this case, bzip2
-       will decline to write compressed output to a terminal,  as
-       this  would  be  entirely  incomprehensible  and therefore
-       pointless.
-
-       bunzip2 (or bzip2 -d) decompresses  all  specified  files.
-       Files which were not created by bzip2 will be detected and
-       ignored, and a warning issued.  bzip2  attempts  to  guess
-       the  filename  for  the decompressed file from that of the
-       compressed file as follows:
-
-              filename.bz2    becomes   filename
-              filename.bz     becomes   filename
-              filename.tbz2   becomes   filename.tar
-              filename.tbz    becomes   filename.tar
-              anyothername    becomes   anyothername.out
-
-       If the file does not end in one of the recognised endings,
-       .bz2,  .bz,  .tbz2 or .tbz, bzip2 complains that it cannot
-       guess the name of the original file, and uses the original
-       name with .out appended.
-
-       As  with compression, supplying no filenames causes decom-
-       pression from standard input to standard output.
-
-       bunzip2 will correctly decompress a file which is the con-
-       catenation of two or more compressed files.  The result is
-       the concatenation of the corresponding uncompressed files.
-       Integrity testing (-t) of concatenated compressed files is
-       also supported.
-
-       You can also compress or decompress files to the  standard
-       output  by giving the -c flag.  Multiple files may be com-
-       pressed and decompressed like this.  The resulting outputs
-       are  fed  sequentially to stdout.  Compression of multiple
-       files in this manner generates a stream containing  multi-
-       ple compressed file representations.  Such a stream can be
-       decompressed correctly only  by  bzip2  version  0.9.0  or
-       later.   Earlier  versions of bzip2 will stop after decom-
-       pressing the first file in the stream.
-
-       bzcat (or bzip2 -dc) decompresses all specified  files  to
-       the standard output.
-
-       bzip2  will  read arguments from the environment variables
-       BZIP2 and BZIP, in  that  order,  and  will  process  them
-       before  any  arguments  read  from the command line.  This
-       gives a convenient way to supply default arguments.
-
-       Compression is always performed, even  if  the  compressed
-       file  is slightly larger than the original.  Files of less
-       than about one hundred bytes tend to get larger, since the
-       compression  mechanism  has  a  constant  overhead  in the
-       region of 50 bytes.  Random data (including the output  of
-       most  file  compressors)  is  coded at about 8.05 bits per
-       byte, giving an expansion of around 0.5%.
-
-       As a self-check for your  protection,  bzip2  uses  32-bit
-       CRCs  to make sure that the decompressed version of a file
-       is identical to the original.  This guards against corrup-
-       tion  of  the compressed data, and against undetected bugs
-       in bzip2 (hopefully very unlikely).  The chances  of  data
-       corruption  going  undetected  is  microscopic,  about one
-       chance in four billion for each file processed.  Be aware,
-       though,  that  the  check occurs upon decompression, so it
-       can only tell you that something is wrong.  It can't  help
-       you  recover  the original uncompressed data.  You can use
-       bzip2recover to try to recover data from damaged files.
-
-       Return values: 0 for a normal exit,  1  for  environmental
-       problems  (file not found, invalid flags, I/O errors, &c),
-       2 to indicate a corrupt compressed file, 3 for an internal
-       consistency error (eg, bug) which caused bzip2 to panic.
-
-
-OPTIONS
-       -c --stdout
-              Compress or decompress to standard output.
-
-       -d --decompress
-              Force  decompression.  bzip2, bunzip2 and bzcat are
-              really the same program,  and  the  decision  about
-              what  actions to take is done on the basis of which
-              name is used.  This flag overrides that  mechanism,
-              and forces bzip2 to decompress.
-
-       -z --compress
-              The   complement   to   -d:   forces   compression,
-              regardless of the invocation name.
-
-       -t --test
-              Check integrity of the specified file(s), but don't
-              decompress  them.   This  really  performs  a trial
-              decompression and throws away the result.
-
-       -f --force
-              Force overwrite of output files.   Normally,  bzip2
-              will  not  overwrite  existing  output files.  Also
-              forces bzip2 to break hard links to files, which it
-              otherwise wouldn't do.
-
-              bzip2  normally  declines to decompress files which
-              don't have the  correct  magic  header  bytes.   If
-              forced  (-f),  however,  it  will  pass  such files
-              through unmodified.  This is how GNU gzip  behaves.
-
-       -k --keep
-              Keep  (don't delete) input files during compression
-              or decompression.
-
-       -s --small
-              Reduce memory usage, for compression, decompression
-              and  testing.   Files  are  decompressed and tested
-              using a modified algorithm which only requires  2.5
-              bytes  per  block byte.  This means any file can be
-              decompressed in 2300k of memory,  albeit  at  about
-              half the normal speed.
-
-              During  compression,  -s  selects  a  block size of
-              200k, which limits memory use to  around  the  same
-              figure,  at  the expense of your compression ratio.
-              In short, if your  machine  is  low  on  memory  (8
-              megabytes  or  less),  use  -s for everything.  See
-              MEMORY MANAGEMENT below.
-
-       -q --quiet
-              Suppress non-essential warning messages.   Messages
-              pertaining  to I/O errors and other critical events
-              will not be suppressed.
-
-       -v --verbose
-              Verbose mode -- show the compression ratio for each
-              file  processed.   Further  -v's  increase the ver-
-              bosity level, spewing out lots of information which
-              is primarily of interest for diagnostic purposes.
-
-       -L --license -V --version
-              Display  the  software  version,  license terms and
-              conditions.
-
-       -1 (or --fast) to -9 (or --best)
-              Set the block size to 100 k, 200 k ..  900  k  when
-              compressing.   Has  no  effect  when decompressing.
-              See MEMORY MANAGEMENT below.  The --fast and --best
-              aliases  are  primarily for GNU gzip compatibility.
-              In particular, --fast doesn't make things  signifi-
-              cantly  faster.   And  --best  merely  selects  the
-              default behaviour.
-
-       --     Treats all subsequent arguments as file names, even
-              if they start with a dash.  This is so you can han-
-              dle files with names beginning  with  a  dash,  for
-              example: bzip2 -- -myfilename.
-
-       --repetitive-fast --repetitive-best
-              These  flags  are  redundant  in versions 0.9.5 and
-              above.  They provided some coarse control over  the
-              behaviour  of the sorting algorithm in earlier ver-
-              sions, which was sometimes useful.  0.9.5 and above
-              have  an  improved  algorithm  which  renders these
-              flags irrelevant.
-
-
-MEMORY MANAGEMENT
-       bzip2 compresses large files in blocks.   The  block  size
-       affects  both  the  compression  ratio  achieved,  and the
-       amount of memory needed for compression and decompression.
-       The  flags  -1  through  -9  specify  the block size to be
-       100,000 bytes through 900,000 bytes (the default)  respec-
-       tively.   At  decompression  time, the block size used for
-       compression is read from  the  header  of  the  compressed
-       file, and bunzip2 then allocates itself just enough memory
-       to decompress the file.  Since block sizes are  stored  in
-       compressed  files,  it follows that the flags -1 to -9 are
-       irrelevant to and so ignored during decompression.
-
-       Compression and decompression requirements, in bytes,  can
-       be estimated as:
-
-              Compression:   400k + ( 8 x block size )
-
-              Decompression: 100k + ( 4 x block size ), or
-                             100k + ( 2.5 x block size )
-
-       Larger  block  sizes  give  rapidly  diminishing  marginal
-       returns.  Most of the compression comes from the first two
-       or  three hundred k of block size, a fact worth bearing in
-       mind when using bzip2  on  small  machines.   It  is  also
-       important  to  appreciate  that  the  decompression memory
-       requirement is set at compression time by  the  choice  of
-       block size.
-
-       For  files  compressed  with  the default 900k block size,
-       bunzip2 will require about 3700 kbytes to decompress.   To
-       support decompression of any file on a 4 megabyte machine,
-       bunzip2 has an option to  decompress  using  approximately
-       half this amount of memory, about 2300 kbytes.  Decompres-
-       sion speed is also halved, so you should use  this  option
-       only where necessary.  The relevant flag is -s.
-
-       In general, try and use the largest block size memory con-
-       straints  allow,  since  that  maximises  the  compression
-       achieved.   Compression and decompression speed are virtu-
-       ally unaffected by block size.
-
-       Another significant point applies to files which fit in  a
-       single  block  --  that  means  most files you'd encounter
-       using a large block  size.   The  amount  of  real  memory
-       touched is proportional to the size of the file, since the
-       file is smaller than a block.  For example, compressing  a
-       file  20,000  bytes  long  with the flag -9 will cause the
-       compressor to allocate around 7600k of  memory,  but  only
-       touch 400k + 20000 * 8 = 560 kbytes of it.  Similarly, the
-       decompressor will allocate 3700k but  only  touch  100k  +
-       20000 * 4 = 180 kbytes.
-
-       Here  is a table which summarises the maximum memory usage
-       for different block sizes.  Also  recorded  is  the  total
-       compressed  size for 14 files of the Calgary Text Compres-
-       sion Corpus totalling 3,141,622 bytes.  This column  gives
-       some  feel  for  how  compression  varies with block size.
-       These figures tend to understate the advantage  of  larger
-       block  sizes  for  larger files, since the Corpus is domi-
-       nated by smaller files.
-
-                  Compress   Decompress   Decompress   Corpus
-           Flag     usage      usage       -s usage     Size
-
-            -1      1200k       500k         350k      914704
-            -2      2000k       900k         600k      877703
-            -3      2800k      1300k         850k      860338
-            -4      3600k      1700k        1100k      846899
-            -5      4400k      2100k        1350k      845160
-            -6      5200k      2500k        1600k      838626
-            -7      6100k      2900k        1850k      834096
-            -8      6800k      3300k        2100k      828642
-            -9      7600k      3700k        2350k      828642
-
-
-RECOVERING DATA FROM DAMAGED FILES
-       bzip2 compresses files in blocks, usually 900kbytes  long.
-       Each block is handled independently.  If a media or trans-
-       mission error causes a multi-block  .bz2  file  to  become
-       damaged,  it  may  be  possible  to  recover data from the
-       undamaged blocks in the file.
-
-       The compressed representation of each block  is  delimited
-       by  a  48-bit pattern, which makes it possible to find the
-       block boundaries with reasonable  certainty.   Each  block
-       also  carries its own 32-bit CRC, so damaged blocks can be
-       distinguished from undamaged ones.
-
-       bzip2recover is a  simple  program  whose  purpose  is  to
-       search  for blocks in .bz2 files, and write each block out
-       into its own .bz2 file.  You can then use bzip2 -t to test
-       the integrity of the resulting files, and decompress those
-       which are undamaged.
-
-       bzip2recover takes a single argument, the name of the dam-
-       aged    file,    and    writes    a    number   of   files
-       "rec00001file.bz2",  "rec00002file.bz2",  etc,  containing
-       the   extracted   blocks.   The   output   filenames   are
-       designed  so  that the use of wildcards in subsequent pro-
-       cessing  -- for example, "bzip2 -dc  rec*file.bz2 > recov-
-       ered_data" -- processes the files in the correct order.
-
-       bzip2recover should be of most use dealing with large .bz2
-       files,  as  these will contain many blocks.  It is clearly
-       futile to use it on damaged single-block  files,  since  a
-       damaged  block  cannot  be recovered.  If you wish to min-
-       imise any potential data loss through media  or  transmis-
-       sion errors, you might consider compressing with a smaller
-       block size.
-
-
-PERFORMANCE NOTES
-       The sorting phase of compression gathers together  similar
-       strings  in  the  file.  Because of this, files containing
-       very long runs of  repeated  symbols,  like  "aabaabaabaab
-       ..."   (repeated  several hundred times) may compress more
-       slowly than normal.  Versions 0.9.5 and  above  fare  much
-       better  than previous versions in this respect.  The ratio
-       between worst-case and average-case compression time is in
-       the  region  of  10:1.  For previous versions, this figure
-       was more like 100:1.  You can use the -vvvv option to mon-
-       itor progress in great detail, if you want.
-
-       Decompression speed is unaffected by these phenomena.
-
-       bzip2  usually  allocates  several  megabytes of memory to
-       operate in, and then charges all over it in a fairly  ran-
-       dom  fashion.   This means that performance, both for com-
-       pressing and decompressing, is largely determined  by  the
-       speed  at  which  your  machine  can service cache misses.
-       Because of this, small changes to the code to  reduce  the
-       miss  rate  have  been observed to give disproportionately
-       large performance improvements.  I imagine bzip2 will per-
-       form best on machines with very large caches.
-
-
-CAVEATS
-       I/O  error  messages  are not as helpful as they could be.
-       bzip2 tries hard to detect I/O errors  and  exit  cleanly,
-       but  the  details  of  what  the problem is sometimes seem
-       rather misleading.
-
-       This manual page pertains to version 1.0.8 of bzip2.  Com-
-       pressed  data created by this version is entirely forwards
-       and  backwards  compatible  with   the   previous   public
-       releases,  versions  0.1pl2,  0.9.0,  0.9.5, 1.0.0, 1.0.1,
-       1.0.2 and above, but with the  following  exception: 0.9.0
-       and above can  correctly decompress  multiple concatenated
-       compressed files.  0.1pl2  cannot do this;  it  will  stop
-       after  decompressing just the first file in the stream.
-
-       bzip2recover  versions prior to 1.0.2 used 32-bit integers
-       to represent bit positions in compressed  files,  so  they
-       could  not handle compressed files more than 512 megabytes
-       long.  Versions 1.0.2 and above use 64-bit  ints  on  some
-       platforms  which  support them (GNU supported targets, and
-       Windows).  To establish whether or  not  bzip2recover  was
-       built  with  such  a limitation, run it without arguments.
-       In any event you can build yourself an  unlimited  version
-       if  you  can  recompile  it  with MaybeUInt64 set to be an
-       unsigned 64-bit integer.
-
-
-AUTHOR
-       Julian Seward, jseward@acm.org
-
-       https://sourceware.org/bzip2/
-
-       The ideas embodied in bzip2 are due to (at least) the fol-
-       lowing  people: Michael Burrows and David Wheeler (for the
-       block sorting transformation), David Wheeler  (again,  for
-       the Huffman coder), Peter Fenwick (for the structured cod-
-       ing model in the original bzip, and many refinements), and
-       Alistair  Moffat,  Radford  Neal  and  Ian Witten (for the
-       arithmetic  coder  in  the  original  bzip).   I  am  much
-       indebted for their help, support and advice.  See the man-
-       ual in the source distribution for pointers to sources  of
-       documentation.  Christian von Roques encouraged me to look
-       for faster sorting algorithms, so as to speed up  compres-
-       sion.  Bela Lubkin encouraged me to improve the worst-case
-       compression performance.  Donna Robinson XMLised the docu-
-       mentation.   The bz* scripts are derived from those of GNU
-       gzip.  Many people sent patches, helped  with  portability
-       problems,  lent  machines,  gave advice and were generally
-       helpful.
-
diff --git a/prepare-release.sh b/prepare-release.sh
index 12c29f7..1bc8474 100755
--- a/prepare-release.sh
+++ b/prepare-release.sh
@@ -45,7 +45,7 @@ sed -i -e "s@ENTITY bz-version \".*\"@ENTITY bz-version \"$VERSION\"@" \
 # isn't, so explicitly change it here too.
 sed -i -e "s@This manual page pertains to version .* of@This manual page pertains to version $VERSION of@" \
        -e "s@sorting file compressor, v.*@sorting file compressor, v$VERSION@" \
-  bzip2.1* bzip2.txt
+  bzip2.1
 
 # Update sources. All sources, use bzlib_private.
 # Except bzip2recover, which embeds a version string...
-- 
2.20.1

  reply	other threads:[~2019-07-21 20:55 UTC|newest]

Thread overview: 6+ messages / expand[flat|nested]  mbox.gz  Atom feed  top
2019-01-01  0:00 Some bzip2 manual page patches from Debian Mark Wielaard
2019-01-01  0:00 ` Mark Wielaard [this message]
2019-01-01  0:00 ` [PATCH 2/3] Mention the --help command line option in the documentation Mark Wielaard
2019-01-01  0:00 ` Some bzip2 manual page patches from Debian Santiago Ruano Rincón
2019-01-01  0:00   ` Mark Wielaard
2019-01-01  0:00 ` [PATCH 1/3] bzip2.1: remove blank spaces in man page and drop the .PU macro Mark Wielaard

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